The Importance of Routine

clock-650753_640

It is common that society – especially in the present day, when new technologies and social networks are the day to day – see the routine expression with some fear. Routine, for most people, refers to something monotonous, annoying, tiresome, that does not give pleasure. When they want to do something new, people often say that they “get out of the rut”, that’s worth it, it’s fun and exciting.

It is worth mentioning, however, that routine is something that is paramount for anyone who wants to plan goals in life. Without it, it is possible that our society had not evolved to the current parameters. The establishment of our species in certain places, as well as the development of agriculture, sought a less unstable reality for survival. Without that, we would still be wandering in search of food.

Fundamental issues in our lives, such as keeping a schedule at work, having a bedtime, eating, or exercising are nothing more than routine. In college, post-graduate, MBA, or any type of qualification, there it is again: the routine of lessons, tests, work, without which we would probably not experience new knowledge.

This does not mean, of course, that our lives should be a timed sequence of routines for every action we take. It is important that we have time to know new things that are not in our daily lives. However, when we complain about the routine, we hardly know that it is precisely the organization that will allow us more leisure time.

The organization of the routine is therefore not an enemy to be fought, but a path that can enable us to plan for our dreams and goals, while at the same time it can create more time for the leisure activities we want, such as trips and family outings. Just as sound is only possible because of silence, to escape the routine, it is necessary to have at least a bit of routine in life.

Advertisements

The Lesser Known Indian Tribes

Chenchu_tribal_hunting

India is a country full of fascinating cultural diversity, it has more to offer than one can experience in one lifetime. There are numerous tribes following and preserving their distinct culture and traditions, that has been practiced by their ancestors since time immemorial. Below is the list of seven lesser known tribes of India and a few lines about them.

  1. Bnei Menashe

They claim to be the descendants of the lost Israeli tribes who came to Manipur after being exiled from their motherland when it was conquered by the Neo-Assyrian Empire in 772 BC. In the 19th century they were converted to Christianity, but in the late 20th century, their claims of being descendants of the Israel’s exiled tribes were finally confirmed by a rabbi from Israel. They then converted back to their original religion.

  1. Sentinelese

This is one of the most elusive tribe in the world. They have no desire of mixing with the rest of the world, and become extremely hostile when an outsider tries to break into their sanctity of elusiveness. Several attempts to establish contacts with them have been made, which were responded by arrows and javelin causing injuries and deaths. Today, the indigenous tribe of Andaman, enjoys complete autonomy with the occasional patrols from the Indian government.

  1. Chenchus

This tribe lives in the Indian states of Andhra Pradesh, Telangana, Karnataka and Odisha. They are still dependent on forests and do not cultivate land but hunt for a living. Non-tribe people living among them rent land from the them and pay them a portion of the harvest. These allow a man or a woman to marry without any parental pressure. Widow remarriage is also not a very big deal for them.

  1. Bishnoi

This tribe of Rajasthan were the original environmental conversationalists of India. In the year 1730, 363 Bishnoi men and women sacrificed their lives to save trees from being cut down by the king of Jodhpur. The Bishnoi community have dug up wells, cultivated vegetation and made the land liveable with their bare hands, where they lead a peaceful and simple life.

  1. Siddi

This tribe is scattered all over India and Pakistan and owes its origin to Southeast Africa. They came to India around 700 A.D as slaves of Arab and Portuguese merchants. Goma, a dance and music form of the African Bantu tribe is still practised by the Siddi tribe in parts of Gujarat where it’s called Dhamaal.

  1. Muria

The Muria tribe is from Chhattisgarh. Traditionally they are economically homogenous and strive to work as a collective. They have mixed-sex dormitories where adolescents are sent to practice premarital sex, sometimes with a single partner and sometimes serially. They have an omnivorous diet, with liquor playing a key role in their society.

  1. Drokpa

They live in Ladakh and are believed to be the descendants of the soldiers of Alexander who came down to India in 327 BC. Drokpas do not marry out of their community to preserve their ethnicity. Dressed magnificently in luscious fur coats and flower pots that sets them apart from the rest of the tribes in the region. They are open about pre-marital sex, polygamy, polyandry and public display of affection are also known to consider wife swapping as a part of their culture and tradition.