Fight your own battles

well

Once upon a time in India there lived a king among frogs named Gangadatta. He ruled over a group of frogs that lived in a well.

One day, Gangadatta left his kingdom. He was fed up of his relatives pestering him over small things and decided to take revenge on everyone who constantly tormented him.

Just as he came out of his well he saw a cobra entering a hole, he immediately decided of having all his relatives, which pestered him, eaten by the cobra.

He went to the entrance of the hole, and said. “My friend, I have come here to make friendship with you. I am Gangadatta, the king of frogs.”

Hearing the voice the cobra immediately realised that this is not his kith or kin, but his natural enemy. Hence he decided not to leave the hole, since he suspected this to be some kind of a vicious plan to catch and then kill him.

“We are no friends, we are natural enemies. Why are you talking all this nonsense? Timber and fire can never be friends.” The cobra said.

“You are absolutely correct. But I seek revenge on everyone who tormented me, compelling me to leave my very own kingdom. I can lead you to the well where my kingdom was, and you can eat as many frogs as you want.”

“But a well is built by layers of stone and I have no legs. How can I possibly get into the well? And even if I manage to do so, where will I be able to sit and eat the frogs? Go away!”

“There is a nice comfortable hole at the edge of the water, where you can sit and eat as many frogs as you like. I will lead you to the inside of the well, and to the comfortable hole. But promise me that you will eat only my annoying relatives and not my friends.”

“I am old and this offer looks too good to be turned down.” The cobra thought.

The cobra agreed to the friendship and followed the frog. He went into the hole as promised. Once there, he would eat one frog whenever he would feel hungry. As days went by, the number of frogs went down and finally all the frogs that tormented Gangadatta were dead.

“All the frogs that pestered you and compelled you to leave the kingdom are dead, now only your friends remain. Please give me some more food. You are a good friend of mine, and since you lead me here it is your responsibility to keep me well fed.” The cobra said.

frog

Gangadatta realised his mistake but was afraid that the cobra would eat him, hence he told him to start eating the remaining frogs in well too. Gangadatta saw all his close friends eaten. Soon there were no frogs left in the well, and the cobra wanted more frogs.

“If you let me leave the well, I will bring you more frogs from the neighbouring wells. So you will be able to satisfy your hunger.” Gangadatta told the cobra.

The cobra let him go. But even after his anxious wait for several days, Gangadatta did not return.

Finally the cobra requested a lizard that lived in the walls of the well. “Please ask Gangadatta to return back. I cannot bear the separation of my dear friend.”

The lizard conveyed the message to Gangadatta who replied. “I will never return to the well again. He is starving, and a starving person can go to any extent to fulfil his needs.”

Thus Gangadatta saved his life, and the cobra had to perish inside the well without any food.

The moral is: Fight your own battles; else you will surely be destroyed.

Presence of mind – Only true friend in your darkest hour

darkest-hour

Life is all about taking chances. Sometimes the choices we make reap us fortunes more than we had ever imagined, but mostly the first thing we meet is failure. Probably lives way of telling us that we did not plan well and that it is time to go back to the drawing board before we make the next move, and with a little bit of caution and good planning we mostly succeed. But what if we encounter a series of failure? Even after being cautious and after meticulously planning each and every detail. The biggest question that haunts us then is, whether there is light at the end of the tunnel? Although what we should be worried about, whether we will be able to survive inside the tunnel?  Let us revisit the story called ‘The Monkey and the Crocodile’ from Panchtantra to find an answer to the question.

jamun_fruits

Jamun

Once upon a time, on the banks of river, there was a monkey, who lived on a Jamun (blackberry) tree. The tree bore sweet fruits and the monkey used to live a happy and content life on it.

One day, a crocodile came out of the river to take some rest under the Jamun tree. When the monkey saw him from the tree, he said, “Try these sweet Jamun.” and tossed a couple of fruits to the crocodile. After this incident, every day the crocodile would come to eat fruits, and soon they became great friends.

One day the crocodile told the monkey that he wanted to take some fruits for his wife, to let her know the sweetness of these fruits. The monkey happily plucked more fruits for the crocodile to take home.

After consuming the juicy fruits the crocodile’s wife said. “These fruits are sweet as nectar. Since the monkey eats these fruits daily, he would be even tastier. Please bring me that monkey’s heart.”

The crocodile said. “He is my friend. I cannot do such a thing.”

After a lot of effort, the crocodile’s wife convinced him.

The next day the crocodile invited the monkey to have supper at his house.

Without any hesitation the monkey accepted the proposal and jumped on the crocodile’s back, and off they went to the crocodile’s home.

monkey-rive

Once they had traveled some distance, the crocodile told the monkey. “After consuming the Jamun fruits, my wife now wants to eat your heart. Since you have been consuming Jamun for so long, my wife believes that your heart should taste better than the Jamun you have all the time.”

The monkey was shocked, but he did not panic. Instead he took a deep breath and said. “You should have told me this earlier. It would be an honor for me to serve your wife my heart.  But I keep my heart in the burrow of the Jamun tree, let us go back and bring my heart.”

The crocodile believed the monkey and brought him back to the Jamun tree. As soon as they reached the tree the monkey jumped off the crocodile’s back and climbed up the tree and sat on a high branch.

Out of reach the monkey yelled. “I have only one heart and it is beating inside me. Now go away and never return back.”

Ashamed of his actions, the crocodile went away.

The moral of the story is, intelligence and presence of mind helps us overcome the most difficult situations.

The wisest thing to do in life is to solve the immediate problem first, and solve one problem at a time. Never lose hope or hesitate to use the tools at your disposal to make things happen.